Kids’ Ocean Day

Filed under: Other Projects, Projects 

NFCC together with the California Coastal Commission helped put together “Kids’ Ocean Day” across California.

“Talking Fish” comprised of over 8,800 students appear at five different California beaches marking Kids’ Ocean Day

Students learn about the ocean and marine debris, conduct beach cleanups, and form giant aerial art messages photographed from the sky (see http://www.oceanday.net/2011.html).

San Francisco, CA – Over 8,800 students from Humboldt to San Diego formed giant talking fish designs on various California beaches to publicize the need to prevent ocean pollution. The group art projects, viewable from the air, took place after beach clean up events, part of the 18th Annual Kids’ Adopt-a-Beach Cleanup. The cleanup events were part of a series of Kids’ Ocean Day Adopt-A-Beach Cleanups at six beaches up and down the California coast and one in Marineland, Florida. Kids’ Ocean Day, honoring World Oceans Day on June 8th, was organized statewide by the California Coastal Commission.

Each event was organized locally and each design depicted a fish with an ocean conservation message. The participants were as follows:

  • San Diego County: Nearly 1,000 students led by I Love A Clean San Diego cleaned Crown Point Shores and created a mako shark saying, “Coexist.”
  • Orange County: 875 kids led by Orange County Coastkeeper cleaned Huntington State Beach and formed a flounder saying, “Clean Seas Please!”
  • Los Angeles County: Over 5,500 students organized by the Malibu Foundation for Environmental Education cleaned up Dockweiler State Beach and sat in formation to make a giant fish saying, “Kelp Us!”
  • San Francisco County: 550 students led by Richardson Bay Audubon cleaned Ocean Beach and created a bat ray saying “Turn the tide,” referring to the need for people to reverse our pollution-creating behaviors and prevent trash from flowing into the oceans.
  • Humboldt County: 900 students organized by Friends of the Dunes cleaned up the South Spit and formed a salmon saying, “Coexist.”
  • Monterey County: 185 students taught by Fresno Chaffee Zoo were bused all the way from their hometown of Fresno to clean and enjoy Monterey Municipal Beach. No aerial art was formed.

Over 5,500 students organized by the Malibu Foundation for Environmental Education cleaned up Dockweiler State Beach and sat in formation to make a giant fish saying, “Kelp Us!”

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